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VMD Online Course List


BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Minimum General Education Credits
Minimum Bachelor's Core plus Degree-Specific/Elective Credits
Minimum Total Semester Credits
36
84
120


Within 120 minimum credit hours, the following requirements also apply:

  • Minimum Major Credits: 36
  • Minimum Total 300/400 Level Credits: 40
  • Minimum Art Credits: 12

PROGRAM CORE

INT350 - Internship
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): sponsor approval
An internship is considered a supervised, practical experience that is the application of previously learned theory. Employers/sponsors work with the student to meet specific objectives and/or learning goals and provide special mentoring or networking opportunities. In exchange, the intern helps the employer/sponsor in meeting overall work goals for the agency/company. Students completing 3.0 credit internships must work a total of 150 hours, or 10 hours per week for 15 weeks.
LAW370 - Legal Issues in Technology
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): ENG101
This course addresses typical legal and business issues in the multimedia field. Rights granted under copyright, principles of fair use, trademarks, intellectual property law, trade secrets, unfair competition, disclosure and privacy laws are covered. Students explore these legal topics with focus on electronic media.
MGT112 - Project Management in a Technology Environment
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
This course covers every aspect of managing a project in a technology environment, from assembling the right team to figuring out a schedule, estimating needed resources and monitoring its progress. This course will cover determination, examination and critiques of current practices in project management with an emphasis on the use of technology to support project development. Also included are real-life project management problems such as the following: how to get results when there is no direct authority over participants, what to do when team members don't follow through, how to handle differing departmental agendas and how to balance regular work with additional responsibilities. Communication skills will also be emphasized.
PRO102 - Professional Skills Development
Credits: 2.00
Prerequisite(s): none
This course is designed to develop life-long learning strategies and provides the basic skills for success in the educational, professional and personal environment. Specific topics explored are personality profile analysis, developmental styles,conflict resolution skills, group problem solving and learning style analysis. Collaboration and group skills development will be emphasized.
PRO211 - Student Innovation Project
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
The purpose of this course is to develop students as technologists. Students will explore and critically analyze a potential and emerging topic for a thesis and shape their ideas into a form that represents a clear set of thinking to be used as the basis for developing their innovation. In creating a topic document based upon these investigations, students will demonstrate the ability to communicate technology ideas to others and increase the likelihood that the idea will take form and find a relevant application in society. The course will culminate with the composition and approval of the student’s topic paper. The topic paper will include an abbreviated introduction of the innovation, short prior art identification and general methodology.
PRO481 - Senior Innovation Project and Portfolio Presentation
Credits: 2.00
Prerequisite(s): PRO300/PRO301 or instructor approval.
This course completes undergraduate thesis and portfolio process providing guidance and structure for the formal presentation of the student’s work. Students will passionately and clearly articulate their innovation, technology concepts and application in a formal defense. Students entering this class are expected to have completed all works included in their portfolio and have their thesis chapters approved through the completion of prior thesis course work prior to enrolling.
TCH150 - Technology and Society
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
TCH150 introduces students to essential elements of the historical, contemporary and possible future interdependencies of technology and society. These elements are discovered through readings, discussions and forecasts related to technological development. This course provides students with tools necessary to understand the role technology plays in society and to prepare students for interaction within a technology-driven world. Technology will be recognized as a driving force in cultural revolutions and as a foundational concept of human development. The course will consider rapidly changing technologies in modern society, the problems associated with these changes and the effects of these technologies on modern culture.
TCH301 - Ethics in Technology
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): ENG101
TCH301 is designed to introduce students to essential concepts necessary to evaluate the ethical implications and potential impacts of the use of new technology within human society and culture. Students will explore modern ethical dilemmas in technology, looking at multiple aspects of how the introduction of technology redefines law and values.

GENERAL EDUCATION

BIO120 - Introduction to Biology
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
This course explores the basic issues of living organisms. The material covered emphasizes molecular and organic biology, as well as the structure and function of plants and animals. Learning activities include lectures, group activities and various practical exercises that help students to better understand biology and to use their knowledge in everyday life, as well as in their future careers.
COM226 - Communication in Technology
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
Students will experience expressing technology concepts to a broad audience. Students will learn best practices in presenting technology products and pitching concepts using business-appropriate communication skills. Effective use of voice, nonverbal skills and visuals will be applied to topics such as robotics, virtual reality, animation, digital video, network security and others. Presentations include peer-to-peer feedback in student-led discussions. In addition, students will have the opportunity to create a resume and be mock interviewed for a technology position.
ENG101 - Composition I
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
This course is designed to present effective techniques in organizing, developing and writing academic essays that reflect a collegiate level of writing. The purpose of this course is to help students write correctly, clearly and thoughtfully. Students will receive an introduction to basic writing, thinking and reading skills required for success in college, with emphasis on fluency in analytical, rhetorical, and creative non-fiction presentation.
ENG102 - Composition II
Credits: 3.00
(GE, Humanities)
Prerequisite(s): ENG101
ENG102 is designed to introduce students to the essential language, theories and strategies of argumentation and research. The purpose of the course is to provide students with the tools necessary to develop arguments for specific audiences within specific rhetorical situations. Students will also develop their critical reading skills: analyzing, evaluating and critiquing the claims and evidence used by various authors. Finally, students will learn proper research skills and write an in-depth research essay/project.
ENG305 - Mythology, Folktale, and Fairy Tale
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
(GS, Humanities)
Escape to the fantastic realms of mythology, folktales, and fairy tales as we read stories from around the world and through the ages. You might be surprised at how pervasive the archetypes and themes from these genres are in our modern world, from the movies all the way to popular animation and games. The course allows students to explore the cultural similarities and differences in myths, folktales and fairy tales through selected readings, discussions and writings.
ENG310 - Science Fiction as Literature
Credits: 3.00
(GE, Humanities)
Prerequisite(s): None

This course will delve into selected readings in the literature of science fiction to show how the genre of science fiction has evolved from the dark fantasy narratives of the 19th century through the start of the 21st century. Students will examine key genre texts from the worlds of print, cinema, and the web.
HIS305 - 20th Century Innovation
Credits: 3.00
(GE, Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): none
This course examines the role of technology in the 20th century and how it affects us culturally. Key themes include invention of new technologies and debates over the advantages and drawbacks of industrialization, mass production and information technologies. Students participate in a variety of innovative activities designed to understand the changes that took place socially and economically because of these innovations
HIS335 - Ancient Greek Warfare
Credits: 3.00
(GE, Social Sciences)
Prerequisite(s): none
This course covers the history and influences of Ancient Greek warfare. The time period and the topics for this course are the Peloponnesian Wars through Alexander’s campaigns.
MAT155 - Mathematics Appreciation
Credits: 3.00
(GE, Mathematics)
Prerequisite(s): none
"Great Ideas" of mathematics are presented to impact how the student views the world. Topics include number, sequence, pattern, algorithm, chance, systems, theory, complexity and simplicity are explored in a variety of contexts. Biographical, historical, and philosophical accents in mathematics are etched into the course.
PSY150 - Psychology of Thinking
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
PSY150 will examine the writings of Pythagoras, the father of formal mathematical thinking; Aristotle’s major works, including his 100-plus tests for the truth of any proposition; and other major thinkers from the classical period to modern times, including Francis Bacon, Galileo and other progenitors
of the natural and behavioral sciences. The course will close with a survey of living thinkers, including “system thinkers” and a study of the major books by Edward de Bono.
PSY310 - Social Psychology
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
Why do people behave a certain way? Can behaviors be predicted, controlled and changed? Have you ever been a victim of somebody who took advantage or tried to manipulate? What are persuasion and brainwashing? This course explores theory, research and application that make up the discipline. It examines both the traditional areas of the field, as well as more recent innovations. The course pays particular attention to the applications developed by social psychologists. The major goal of the course is to explicitly tie social psychology to lives of students.
PSY360 - Psychology of Creativity
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): PSY101 or PSY150
What do Einstein, Picasso and Bill Gates have in common? What are inspiration, insight and improvisation? Are the Muses necessary or is there another way to develop imagination? Students can get answers to these and other questions in this highly interactive course. Discover the genius inside. This course provides a historical review of a variety of approaches to creativity. The material covered emphasizes psychological components of the creative process, the application of creativity in the writing process, the visual arts as well as music, leadership, problem solving and science, the preconditions for creativity and the general characteristics of creative people. Learning activities include practical activities and exercises that can be used to improve personal traits and attributes as well as enhance creative potential.

DEGREE COURSES

ART103 - Digital Asset Creation
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
This course is an overview of Adobe Photoshop and its application in creating graphical assets and collateral graphic materials. This course will cover asset creation from scratch as well as the process for using graphics in applications and on the web. The course will examine and apply the basic tools needed to function and design assets.
ART111 - Communicating with Color & 2D Design
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
This course combines the application of color theory and introductory design principles. The function of traditional design principles incorporating color perception and color psychology give students a strong understanding of basic visual communication elements. Digital and traditional methods in design, color issues, and media manipulation are covered, along with designing for an ethnically diverse international audience.
ART121 - Beginning Drawing I
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
Is drawing a gift that has to come naturally? It is actually a skill like any other. This course will demonstrate how easily it can be learned. Drawing is as much about learning how to see and think about form and space as it is about technique. The drawing part itself is just marks on paper. Those marks come together to tell the viewer something about the world that the artist experienced. Drawing also gives one a deeper understanding of the subject being captured. As students progress through the exercises in this class, they will develop a better understanding of the forms being observed and become more skillful in representing them. Improving drawing skills on paper can improve digital drawing skills. ART121 is an introduction to basic drawing concepts and provides a basic foundation in drawing. The course emphasis will be on traditional compositional theory, drawing principles, fundamentals of observing and describing form. Students will gain a strong understanding of tonal and dimensional perspective.
ART236 - Basic Character Figure Drawing
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): ART121
This course explores a full range of techniques and artistic viewpoints to animate drawings. Emphasis will be on learning to sketch the human and animal forms in both stick and geometric figures studies. Students will learn the skeletal and muscular make up of the figures. Studies in the form of homework assignments will be required as well as in class work. Long and short poses will be interspersed with exercises specifically designed to allow artists to heighten perceptions. Students will practice using the formulas for making character sketches more realistic by understanding the volumetric description and underlying structure of the human form. This course provides the most thorough experience drawing from live models.
DVA101 - Digital Video Fundamentals
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
This course familiarizes students with digital video production equipment while immersing them in the basic aesthetics of motion picture production. Hands-on projects involve scriptwriting, storyboarding, camera work, continuity, 3-point lighting, sound recording and basic video editing. Students work in groups to complete various technical exercises which familiarize them with terms and equipment while preparing them to produce complete digital video works.
DVA110 - Lighting and Environment Design
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
This course introduces the student to the theories and techniques used in lighting and scene design when creating a setting for digital video, animation or game projects. Script analysis and interpretation may be used to teach the principles of style, form and balance in scene design. Lighting subjects include the psychological effects of light and color. Students will be introduced to the basic lighting elements of visibility, selective focus, modeling and imparting mood to a scene.
DVA243 - 3D Modeling: 3ds Max
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): MTM101
This class will explore modeling with polygons, patches, NURBS and subdivision surfaces, and will discuss when each is appropriate. Students will study organic and hard surface modeling. Topics will also include a review of the history of 3D computer graphics, an overview of the current state of the 3D industry, an introduction to the current technology being used and a survey of the skills needed to work in today's industry. Students will model using polygons, subdivision surfaces, patches and NURBS. Areas of emphasis include sculpting tools, extruding, Boolean, lofting, revolving and deformers. Students will complete exercises that build toward a final project. This class will also introduce basic lighting, texturing, rendering and animation techniques.
DVA244 - 3D Animation: 3ds Max
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): DVA243
Recommended: DVA130, THE230
This course introduces the student to industry-standard 3D techniques used to animate objects and characters. Students will learn fundamental character animation principles. Topics include key frame animation, motion blending, motion capture, interpolation, storytelling and basic cinematography. Concepts are illustrated using animated footage. Students animate 3D objects and characters for exercises that build toward a final project. Areas of emphasis include inverse kinematics, constraints, deformers, custom attributes and lip sync. Students will also explore expressions, particle systems and dynamics.
DVA245 - 3D Materials: 3ds Max
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): DVA243
This course is an introduction to the fine art of creating materials and textures for the 3D environment. Areas of emphasis include shading models, 2D bitmap and 3D procedural texture types; solid and surface mapping types; and techniques for creating both stylized and realistic textures. This course gives students hands-on experience in creating materials and textures for the 3D environment, applying those materials to objects and rendering them. Students will focus on creating textures from scratch, using photo manipulation techniques, as well as procedural texturing methods. Individual and team-oriented projects will be applied.
VIS110 - Scientific Visualization
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): none
This is an introductory course that surveys the expanding field of Scientific Visualization, and will explore various industries, data display methods and technologies, visualization types, and scenarios in which data visualizations are utilized.
VIS210 - Information Visualization
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): VIS110
This class will explore the history and means of presenting data in meaningful ways to decision makers. Students will gain an understanding and demonstrate how to visualize information to users in a variety of formats including transactional database visualization. In addition to exploring many different information visualization methods and metaphors, students in this course will create their own information visualization projects. These projects can range from novel methods for displaying stock market data, to the social network distance of Kevin Bacon to the most recent 20 presidents.
VIS310 - Embedded Visualization
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): VIS210
Data visualizations are embedded when they correlate data to a physical phenomenon or object through compositing, projection, haptics or integrated hardware technologies. Examples are a national map that responsively displays crime statistics by county over time, or a video of a roller coaster that displays g-force, acceleration and speed values in real time. Using their knowledge of visualization strategies and hardware technologies, students will create their own embedded data visualizations.
VIS410 - Scientific Visualization Project
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): VIS310
The use of multimedia and visualization technology and practices will be put to use in this course. Students in this course will propose, design, develop, deploy, and test applications to solve a stated scientific visualization need. This will require the analysis of the data or situation as well as the skills necessary create an application to communicate this information to the end user.

ELECTIVE COURSES

ART260 - Art and Technology
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
Technology and artistic practice have always been closely linked together, from cave paintings to computers. The course will provide an overview of their intersections and overlaps throughout history, with an emphasis on the 20th century and on new technological developments and their integration in art research and production. It will unveil some art trends of more modern technological innovations such as the internet, cyborgs, virtual reality and genetic engineering. Students will be introduced to contemporary and historical directions and methodologies through seminar lectures, research resentations and a final project.
CSC102 - Introduction to Programming
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
The purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of computer science and programming to students majoring in this area. Students will become familiar with problem-solving techniques and algorithm development using computers, including a structured high-level programming language. Students will also explore object-oriented programming including the design considerations and conventions used in development of object-oriented applications. Topics will include flow of control, assignment, arrays, functions, and input and output, among others.
CSC215 - C/C++ Programming I
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): CSC102
C++ is a general-purpose programming language that supports object-oriented programming and is suited for all types of development. This course presents the entire language and the Standard Template Library (STL) to the student. Students will learn the syntax, keywords and constructs, as well as how to leverage the resources of the STL. This is a project-based class and students will develop applications with C++ using real world tools and practices.
HCI101 - Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
This course will cover some of the core concepts in HCI relating to users and technology use. These include the notions of the interface, interactivity and interaction. Traditional ways of characterizing these aspects of the relationship between technology and users will also be examined in terms of various usability aspects.
MTM105 - Code + Design
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
Within the context of emerging media forms, computational and procedural literacy are now critical skills for contemporary artists and designers. This class is an introduction to the basic programmatic structures emphasizing visual output and allows students to investigate the technical and aesthetic potential of programming as a creative practice. As a foundational course, this course introduces skills necessary for the future explorations into the aspects of interactivity, generative forms, visualization, digital fabrication, and physical computing.
MTM215 - Principles of Interactivity
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): None
As viewers increasingly take on roles of active participants in new technologies, the need has arisen for the assessment of the scope of interactive processes in the multitude of media such as computers, cinema, TV and web technologies, and virtual reality. The course traces the development of new media from their historical perspectives to their possible future developments within the framework of interactivity, and how participants' roles are going to evolve as new technologies emerge. This course will explore the criteria of meaningful interactions and will give students a basis for developing immersive interactive experiences.
MTM305 - Multimedia Authoring: Director
Credits: 3.00
Prerequisite(s): MTM101, MTM213
This course is a study of the integration of components used in multimedia and game applications using authoring software. Students use industry standard software as a tool for producing interactive projects. Topics include basic animation techniques, special effects, transitions, user interactivity, Lingo scripting, and advanced animation techniques. Efficiency and optimization of programs will be emphasized.